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THE EMPIRE OF THE PHILIPPINES

FLAGS AND SYMBOLS FROM 1800 TO 1900 CENTURY

FLORENCIO ENTRENCHERADO IN HIGH UNIFORM



FLORENCIO INTRENCHERADO WITH HIGH UNIFORM AND CROWN OF EMPEROR OF THE PHILIPPINES

Florencio Intrencherado 1871-1935 . (Image from : Philippines Free Press, May 21, 1927).*
Emperor Flor Intrencherado proclaimed himself "Emperor" of the Philippines, claiming that his powers were derived directly from Jose' Rizal, as well as the martyr Fr. Jose' Burgos and the Holy Ghost.


AMERICAN MAP OF ILOILO AND JARO AREA , 1918

American map of Iloilo and Jaro Area when started the "Empire of the Philippines" .



Flor Intrencherado, one time Emperor of the Philippines,´ by his personal magnetismand leadership was able to sway the ignorant masses and bring a revolt in the rich sugar provinceof Occidental Negros. For a day, a bolo-armed, barefooted mobs held the richest towns of the province, before trained constabulary could be brought to the scene and use their high-poweredrifles to force Emperor Intrencherado's men to retire.Intrencherado began as a common or garden variety of prophet, such as flourish amongthe ignorant and superstitious masses in the Philippines. Somewhere he had read or heard of Roman history, and intended to follow the footsteps of Numa Pompilius, successor of Romulus,who according to the half-fabulous, half-historical accounts of the Early Roman Empire, put thegrowing nation on its feet after being unanimously elected king by the Roman people. As in the time of Early Roman Empire,´ Intrencherado announced in his platform, there will be no troubles, there will be peace, there will be no punishment; I will do nine times better than Numa did.´What really drew the masses to follow him, however, was not his grandiloquent speecheson the glories of Rome, but a promise to reduce the unpopular head-tax or cedula from 1$ to only10 cents, and his plan for gigantic army composed of officers, with places for all his friends.He had his paper army drawn up to the minutest detail. There were to be:

Six kings, 28 counts, 1267 generals, 2534 brigadiers, 6068 colonels, 10,136 majors,20,272 captains, 40,554 lieutenants, 81,088 sergeants, 162,776 corporals, 275,199 privates.The combined salaries of all these men were to be in excess of $135,000,000 annually.Intrencherado, at first, was thought to be a harmless maniac, peddling his Book of "Salvation" in which he outlined his plans, for five centavos a copy, but one day town officials of Occidental Negros woke up and found themselves in the grip of a barefoot army that had quietlygathered the night before. The town police were helpless.Intrencherado¶s commands to his men were first to take charge of the government andthen to take possession of the Chinese stores. Retail business in the Philippines is a monopoly of the Chinese, and they are thought of by the natives as repository of wealth. An inventory of thewas to be made; one-third of the goods and money was to be given to Intrencherado, one-third tothe leaders and one-third to the soldiers of Intrencherado¶s army.For the most part of the "army" was orderly. At La Castellana, three Spanish plantationowners were tied to posts and flogged. The policemen on duty were captured by throwing sandin their faces and then tying them up.Only in Bago, of the larger towns assaulted, were the insurgents unsuccessful. Here themayor invited 200 of the invaders to inspect the municipal buildings and the jail before takingover the government. After herding them inside the jail, he slipped out and locked the peopleinside.The constabulary were on the scene by night, but four officials in the province werekilled and a number of Intrencherado's men were shot down before, with their "emperor," theyretreated across the strait of Guimaras and, armed with daggers and bolos -the Filipino huntingand working knife - flocked to the nipa and bamboo headquarters of the emperor, near the townof Iloilo, swearing to die rather than permit his surrender to the authorities. Intrencherado's loyalfollowing was at least 30,000 fanatics, and the situation was critical.The combined force of the native constabulary and the small United States armydetachment in the Philippines could have forced the surrender with difficulty, and hundreds of ignorant natives would be killed.Governor-General Wood rushed down to Iloilo in his little yacht, the Apo, and succeededin having Intrencherado come aboard, after a day of negotiations. After breakfasting with thechief executive, and a good heart-to-heart talk, Intrencherado agreed to surrender, disband hisfollowers, and leave for Manila. And so he did.Gradually the forces of superstition disintegrated, with the old man in San Lazaro, wherehe was put because it was too dangerous, because of all those credulous followers to prosecute

their "emperor " for sedition. Under the public health rules, Intrencherado was quietly restrained,while his followers were given a chance to calm down.Intrencherado early in 1924 had predicted the end of the world to take place on February4, 1929. There was a revival of excitement in Occidental Negros and Iloilo provinces before thisdate, when, according to the prophet, ³the winds will blow at a speed of 2500 miles an hour andwhatever objects they blown on, be it of stone or iron, all will be blown to pieces.When the fatal day passed, with nothing out of the ordinary occurring, faith inIntrencherado began to weaken.Last May, when a total eclipse of the sun occurred in a pathway through the centralPhilippines, the people were so quiet and orderly that it was believed safe to releaseIntrencherado, and so he was allowed to leave, on the promise to abstain from the more violentforms of prophecy in the future. Most of the 200 peasants charged with sedition and the 100charged with rebellion and murder following the outbreak have likewise been release.Intrencherado was no more crazy than you or I. He knew what he wanted, and went aboutit, and if the Philippines had been under another rule than that of the United States, he might betoday be in reality ruler of the islands.In San Lazaro he was not loath to entertain with his great plans for a Malay kingdom,with his army and jobs for all, and his promise of no taxes. With these promises dangling before the ignorant and superstitious, he was enabled at the height of his power, over a period of two years, to live in luxury, with a $10,000 crown, robes of finest silk, and in an atmosphere of adulation.

Article fom: The Evening Entertainment - January 18, 1930

...The Emperor Flor Intrencherado, one Florencio Natividad, caused a brief flurry of unrest in Negros. Intrencherado had been valuable aide to Captain W. A. Smith of the Constabulary years before in the pursuit of "Papa" Isio.Nothing was heard of the man ofor almost two decades until he suddenly came into prominence in Jaro by rasing a red flag above his house, and beginning to preach of his supernatural powers. " ....

A fortunate venture into dried fish businness in 1921 netted him the sum of 11,000 pesos, and with that he returned to Jaro to lay plans for an ambitius future. In 1925 he began a campaign for his "Imperial Government". At this time he announced his andidacy for thre Governorship of Ilo-Ilo with a platform committed tothe division of the island of Panay into several dukedoms with himself as "Emperor of the Archipelago".
...When they reached the total of more than 26,000, Intrencherado decided it was time to take over the government. Consolidating 300 of his men at Victorias Negros early on the morning of may 13, 1936, he instructed them to take over the town. Intrencherado was not there in person; he sent as his lieutenant one Policarpio Montarde, who wrapped a white towel about his head and entered the Municipal building, stating he wished to read a "law from Paris". ....

From: Jungle Patrol, the Story of the Philippine Constabulary (1901-1936)
By Vic Hurley page 365- 366

* Thanks to Jim Richardson for the image and source

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